Theistic Evolution

Obviously, god did it.

Suppose you’re speaking with a believer who says, “Well I think evolution is true, I just believe that God designed the world through evolution.”

I think it’s great that the believer is so accepting of scientific research. It’s very, very important to learn about ourselves and our world! But let me spell out the differences between the neutral view and the theistic view. Continue reading “Theistic Evolution”

Talking to Strangers at Parties

Avoiding long awkward silences one question at a time.

I suck at talking to strangers. I used to better at it in my dating days, and when I worked for a digital marketing agency where we were expected to attend networking events and connect with people. You see, I’m an introvert, and somewhat socially awkward. I am hyper-aware of what other people might think of me, so sometimes I just don’t know what to say for fear of sounding stupid. To cope, I generally avoid one-on-one conversations with strangers at parties. When I’m in a group, I pray that someone else does all the talking, so I can just interject little tid-bits here and there. I don’t think I am alone in this; lots of people can relate. Right? Continue reading “Talking to Strangers at Parties”

Conversations!

Have we all forgotten our humanity? Oh. Of course not–because humans also LOVE drama.

There’s a guy at the renaissance festival that runs a puppet stand for a character named “Lord Felton”. He sometimes roams the festival and you can see him and his puppet together, but other times, he parks himself behind a black curtain in a little booth and he (Lord Felton) hawks, “Cooooooo-nversations!” Kids go up to the booth to talk to the puppet, but are often at a loss at what to say to him. Next to him is a little roulette wheel with various topics written in chalk on it. Spin the wheel and off they go! Conversations last anywhere from 30 seconds to a few minutes. He’s one of my favorite characters at the festival, and he’s really fun to watch. Continue reading “Conversations!”

“Primates are collectively defined as any gill-less, organic RNA/DNA protein-based…

—Aron Ra

…metabolic, metazoic, nucleic, diploid, bilaterally symmetrical, endothermic, digestive, tryploblast, opisthokont, deuterostome coelomate with a spinal cord and 12 cranial nerves connecting to a limbic system in an enlarged cerebral cortex with a reduced olfactory region inside a jawed skull with specialized teeth including canines and premolars, forward-oriented fully enclosed optical orbits, and a single temporal fenestra, -attached to a vertebrate hind-leg dominant tetrapoidal skeleton with sacral pelvis, clavical, and wrist and ankle bones; and having lungs, tear ducts, body-wide hair follicles, lactal mammaries, opposable thumbs, and keratinized dermis with chitinous nails on all five digits on all four extremities in addition to an embryonic development in amniotic fluid, leading to a placental birth and highly social lifestyle.”

Quoted from 11th Foundational Falsehood of Creationism

Image Source: rosefirerising

Hans in Luck | The Brothers Grimm

I like fairy tales, and a lot of good ones are not only in the public domain, but useful teaching aids as well. …although some of them teach a somewhat dark lesson… As a continuation of my “Secular Lessons” I’ll read some random fairy tales and copy-paste them on my blog. I’ll read them to my kid when he’s older.

Human speech is about 160 words per minute, and with that figure, I’ll post at the beginning of the stories how many minutes it might take to read it out loud to your kid. At the end of the story, I’ll post some questions I can think of (and maybe offer a few potential answers of my own), and if I happen to think of a fun activity to help further illustrate the story, I’ll also leave that as well.

Okay, here we go–the first fairy tale is from the Brothers Grimm, “Hans in Luck” Continue reading “Hans in Luck | The Brothers Grimm”